The Death of the “Dust Lady” : A terrible reminder of the health consequences of 9/11.

When the Twin Towers collapsed to the ground on September 11, 2001, a massive cloud of smoke, dust and debris released hazardous asbestos fibers, toxins and toxic substances into the air. Asbestos fireproofing materials from 20 stories of the towers came showering down on New York City. According to reports from the EPA, the implosion from the towers “pulverized asbestos to ultra-fine particles.”

lady dust
Lady Dust

The World Trade Center Health Registry estimates about 410,000 people were exposed to a host of toxins including asbestos during the rescue, recovery and clean-up efforts that followed 9/11. Lady Dust who recently died from stomach cancer was one of the victims. But some of the people most affected at Ground Zero were those assigned to rescue survivors. These workers were among the first on the scene and the last to leave the wreckage. Search and rescue workers and others responsible for cleaning up the debris in the months after the towers collapsed were also exposed to asbestos.

 


More than 1,100 people who worked or lived near the World Trade Center on 9/11 have been diagnosed with cancer, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


 

911 toxins

9/11 and the Asbestos Lung Cancer Danger.

Asbestos lung cancer is a rare type of lung cancer, which is the most common cause of cancer death in the United States. An estimated 4,800 deaths a year are linked to this illness, a number that represents about 4 percent of all U.S. fatalities connected to cancer of the lungs. The overwhelming majority of other deaths — about 90 percent — are linked to smoking.

Medical researchers first made a probable causal relationship between exposure to asbestos and lung cancer in 1935. Seven years later, a member of the National Cancer Institute confirmed asbestos as a cause of lung cancer. Study after study continued to show the cause-effect relationship of asbestos and lung cancer. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in 1986 proclaimed lung cancer as the greatest risk for Americans who worked with asbestos.

Like mesothelioma, another asbestos-related cancer, lung cancer associated with asbestos is typically diagnosed at a late stage of development because of the long latency period of development and the onset of symptoms.

Similarities and Differences of Mesothelioma and Asbestos Lung Cancer: Both take decades to develop, but only months to spread to distant organs. They have similar diagnostic procedures and treatment techniques; however, the diseases differ in physical characteristics and non-asbestos risk factors. .